Africa could unite in a blink of an eye.

In the previous article we asked, “Could Pan Africanism have existed before colonialism?” well if you find this theorem new i suggest you click on the link or scroll back and get an insight of what we are having for dinner today.

The african people have always had a unique societal structure and knowledge was in most places passed on orally except for those elite who managed to gather knowledge and like i said before knowledge was a privilege to the elite class. From the Nyero rock paintings to the Ethiopian writings, an area anciently known as the kingdom of Kush and ancient Nubia in Southern Sudan.

A person born of a black smith in most cases inherited the skills of the parents and became a black smith, one born of a peasant farmer in most cases ended up as a farmer too, same for one born of a medicine man and those born into the family of warriors. Those born into royalty eventually claimed authority and a piece of the empire and it was such trends that saw its collapse because the multiple kingdoms that were formed after the collapse of the empire were created by princes and princesses who resisted rule and established their very own authority.

By the time the imperialists invaded Africa, it was split into different kingdoms and societies fighting against each other over land and other small issues. They did not meet a united force like that of Ethiopia that could gather forces and repel colonial rule. They met a disorganized sub Saharan Africa still struggling to restructure itself to build a united force.

No wander the Buganda kingdom fell for the bait and believed that the British were doing their bidding by fighting and conquering its neighboring kingdoms and chiefdoms.

The colonialists took advantage of this situation and maximized their opportunities. By the time areas like Bunyoro were uniting with Acholi and Lango to stage a resistance under Omukama Kabalega and chief Awich, the British had already established strong bases and could not be repelled.

A beautiful historic event that seems to be fading away among the african youths of today.

It was then that Africans in the sub saharan region so the need to unite against one enemy as before hence the birth of the term “PAN AFRICANISM” a united force that would intern see the liberation of multiple states across the region. The plan and ideology was to liberate the entire continent and establish a united rule, unfortunately after the different states were liberated the greedy leaders assumed the notion of we have arrived Africans instead developed pride in these independent nations and the whole idea was whisked away and long forgotten.

Before the colonialists came in play Africans didn’t see the need to have such organization because the societies were generally peaceful and as mentioned earlier the elite groups that governed the societies in one way or another shared knowledge and a history. These multiple kingdoms and chiefdoms were more alike than you think, the kind of wars or conflicts that existed between the different societies were not to a big magnitude they were basic small land wrangles, cattle raids and inter tribal issues, it was never about cultural annihilation. In fact the sieges that happened and revolutions were internal all caused as a result of personal issues like the story of the spear and the bead/ Gipir and Labongo an internal fight between blood brothers that saw the collapse of the dynasty and massive migrations in the region.

So i ask again, if we could get together then, what’s halting full African integration? Is it the politics or aren’t people interested in it. How far has this ideology reached amongst the masses? How do we measure this if we don’t speak the same language with one voice, a united african voice.

L.T

Published by Thomas Lamony

Lawyer, Writer, Environmentalist, APS/Special Duties-State House Uganda, Artist of the mind. "There is no end to the writing and reading of books, neither is there an end to human evolution." The mind is a kitchen, cook something.

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